Gadgets Reviews Videos

Tearing Down an Apple Watch

Apple has recently launched its most personal product ever. And their were only hand full of stores from where you could actually buy an Apple watch on its launch day. Now as many people has got their hands on the Apple watch. iFixit goes beyond this, They’ve just uploaded a video on YouTube with still images of tearing apart a brand new Apple watch.

Gwendolyn Gay, Host for iFixit Video on YouTube says that

We’ve been waiting Eight long months since it was announced to get our hands on one and now we’ve got it. Our teardown team once again traveled beyond the international dateline, to join our friends at MacFixit in Melbourne Australia, to be one of the first people on earth to get an Apple Watch.  What mysteries will we find inside the most personal device Apple has ever made? There’s only one way to find out and that’s to tear it down.

38mm Silver Aluminum Case Sport Model was the watch Team iFixit teared apart. Just to remind you that the Apple Sport collection cases are made from lightweight anodized aluminum in silver and space gray. The display is protected by strengthened Ion-X glass. And the matching fluoroelastomer band comes in five different colors.

Tearing Down Apple Watch

Team iFixit didnt found it difficult to get the watchband off. Its easy enough just depressed on the band release button on the back case releases the spring-loaded medal pack on the band. You can slide it off then.

After removing the bands off. Team iFixit started by prying open the display and disconnecting the display and digitizer cables underneath, getting a first look at the Taptic Engine, inside of the Digital Crown and internal 205 mAh battery. Digging further into the Apple Watch, the team got a closer look at various components for haptic feedback, an ambient light sensor and S1 integrated processor.

The back of the S1 isn’t as pretty as the front, with ribbon cables running to every peripheral and gobs of adhesive gripping it in place, the chip leaves a nasty mess in its wake. Pulling this mess out is a destructive procedure, but after ripping out some soldered connectors we get our first real look at the S1. The S1-emblazoned silver cap isn’t a cap at all. It’s a solid block of plasticky resin, hiding treasures deep within. The fully encased S1 system makes board-level repairs impossible.

Watch the video of iFixit it yourself to get the Apple watch know better.

Overall, the Apple Watch received a 5 out of 10 repairability score (10 is easiest to repair) which means that – to some extent Apple watch is considerably repairable but for some parts its impossible to repair them. It’s good to know there are some things you’ll be able to fix – notable the screen and battery – but the rest is pretty much locked. And you’re not going to be upgrading your own Watch anytime soon, which isn’t at all surprising for an Apple product.

 

Via: iFixit Video